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120110_GRIESER_1180

Whale watching aboard the Schooner, America off San Diego on a beautiful day as California Grey Whales migrate south towards Mexico and Baja California.
The gray whale, (Eschrichtius robustus), is a baleen whale that migrates between feeding and breeding grounds yearly. It reaches a length of about 16 m (52 ft), a weight of 36 tonnes (35 long tons; 40 short tons), and lives 50–70 years.[3] The common name of the whale comes from the gray patches and white mottling on its dark skin. Gray whales were once called devil fish because of their fighting behavior when hunted.[5] The Gray whale is the sole living species in the genus Eschrichtius, which in turn is the sole living genus in the family Eschrichtiidae. This mammal descended from filter-feeding whales that developed at the beginning of the Oligocene, over 30 million years ago. The gray whale is a dark slate-gray in color and covered by characteristic gray-white patterns, scars left by parasites which drop off in its cold feeding grounds. Individual whales are typically identified using photographs of their dorsal surface and matching the scars and patches associated with parasites that have fallen off the whale or are still attached.
Gray whales measure from 16 feet (4.9 m) in length for newborns to 43–50 feet (13–15 m) for adults (females tend to be slightly larger than adult males). Newborns are a darker gray to black in color. A mature gray whale can reach 40 tonnes (39 long tons; 44 short tons), with a typical range of 15 to 33 tonnes (15 to 32 long tons; 17 to 36 short tons)
©Bob Grieser/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM

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Keywords:America, Baja California, California, Grey whales, Mexico, Sea, animal, baby, baja, baleen, baleen whale, barnacles, blow, blue, boat, breaching, cetacean, deep, dive, diving, female, fin, fish, flip, frolicking, gray, gray whale, grey, grey whale, jumping, lagoon, lopez mateos, mammal, mammals, marine, marine mammal, ocean, salt, sanctuary, schooner America, song, spray, surface, swimming, tail, watching, water, whale, whale migration, whales, wild, wildlife, young

120110_GRIESER_1180

120110_GRIESER_1180

Whale watching aboard the Schooner, America off San Diego on a beautiful day as California Grey Whales migrate south towards Mexico and Baja California.
The gray whale, (Eschrichtius robustus), is a baleen whale that migrates between feeding and breeding grounds yearly. It reaches a length of about 16 m (52 ft), a weight of 36 tonnes (35 long tons; 40 short tons), and lives 50–70 years.[3] The common name of the whale comes from the gray patches and white mottling on its dark skin. Gray whales were once called devil fish because of their fighting behavior when hunted.[5] The Gray whale is the sole living species in the genus Eschrichtius, which in turn is the sole living genus in the family Eschrichtiidae. This mammal descended from filter-feeding whales that developed at the beginning of the Oligocene, over 30 million years ago. The gray whale is a dark slate-gray in color and covered by characteristic gray-white patterns, scars left by parasites which drop off in its cold feeding grounds. Individual whales are typically identified using photographs of their dorsal surface and matching the scars and patches associated with parasites that have fallen off the whale or are still attached.
Gray whales measure from 16 feet (4.9 m) in length for newborns to 43–50 feet (13–15 m) for adults (females tend to be slightly larger than adult males). Newborns are a darker gray to black in color. A mature gray whale can reach 40 tonnes (39 long tons; 44 short tons), with a typical range of 15 to 33 tonnes (15 to 32 long tons; 17 to 36 short tons)
©Bob Grieser/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM