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120122_TODD_0042

Key Largo is an island in the upper Florida Keys archipelago and, at 33 miles (53 km) long, the largest of the Keys. It is also the northernmost of the Florida Keys in Monroe County, and the northernmost of the Keys connected by U.S. Highway 1 (the Overseas Highway). Its earlier Spanish name was Cayo Largo, meaning Long Key. Key Largo is connected to the mainland in Miami-Dade County by two routes. The Overseas Highway, which is U.S. Highway 1, enters Key Largo at Jewfish Creek near the middle of the island and turns southwest. Card Sound Road connects to the northern part of Key Largo at Card Sound Bridge and runs southeastward to connect with County Road 905, which runs southwest and joins U.S. 1 at about mile marker 106. These routes originate at Florida City on the mainland. Key Largo is a popular tourist destination, and calls itself the "Diving Capital of the World" because the living coral reef a few miles offshore attracts thousands of scuba divers and sport-fishing enthusiasts. Key Largo's proximity to the Everglades also makes it a premier destination for kayakers and ecotourists. Automotive and highway pioneer and Miami Beach developer Carl G. Fisher built Key Largo's famous Caribbean Club in 1938 as his last project. The island gained fame as the setting for the 1948 film Key Largo, but apart from background filming used for establishing shots, the film was shot on a Warner Brothers sound stage in Hollywood. After the film's success, pressure from local businesses resulted in a change in the name of the post office serving the northern part of the island, from Rock Harbour to Key Largo, on 1 June 1952. After that, every resident north of Tavernier had a Key Largo address and the cancellation read Key Largo. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM
OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY

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Keywords:Florida, Florida Keys, Key Largo, Sea, adventure, animals, atlantic ocean, backgrounds nature, below, beneath the surface, blue water, boat, coast guard, colorful, coral, coral reef, coral reefs, divers, diving, fish, fisheye, florida diving, john pennekamp state park, key west, life, light rays, marine environment, nature, ocean, reef, sand, scuba, scuba divers, scuba diving, sea creatures, sea life, ship, ships, shipwreck, shipwrecks, snorkeling, sun rays, sunken ship, swimming, tropical, underwater, water, wildlife, wreck, wrecks

120122_TODD_0042

120122_TODD_0042

Key Largo is an island in the upper Florida Keys archipelago and, at 33 miles (53 km) long, the largest of the Keys. It is also the northernmost of the Florida Keys in Monroe County, and the northernmost of the Keys connected by U.S. Highway 1 (the Overseas Highway). Its earlier Spanish name was Cayo Largo, meaning Long Key. Key Largo is connected to the mainland in Miami-Dade County by two routes. The Overseas Highway, which is U.S. Highway 1, enters Key Largo at Jewfish Creek near the middle of the island and turns southwest. Card Sound Road connects to the northern part of Key Largo at Card Sound Bridge and runs southeastward to connect with County Road 905, which runs southwest and joins U.S. 1 at about mile marker 106. These routes originate at Florida City on the mainland. Key Largo is a popular tourist destination, and calls itself the "Diving Capital of the World" because the living coral reef a few miles offshore attracts thousands of scuba divers and sport-fishing enthusiasts. Key Largo's proximity to the Everglades also makes it a premier destination for kayakers and ecotourists. Automotive and highway pioneer and Miami Beach developer Carl G. Fisher built Key Largo's famous Caribbean Club in 1938 as his last project. The island gained fame as the setting for the 1948 film Key Largo, but apart from background filming used for establishing shots, the film was shot on a Warner Brothers sound stage in Hollywood. After the film's success, pressure from local businesses resulted in a change in the name of the post office serving the northern part of the island, from Rock Harbour to Key Largo, on 1 June 1952. After that, every resident north of Tavernier had a Key Largo address and the cancellation read Key Largo. ©Paul Todd/OUTSIDEIMAGES.COM
OUTSIDE IMAGES PHOTO AGENCY